1999 STICK SCIENCE DYE CONTEST
Winner: Ian Booz
Design: Confetti Eddie




I chose the color combination because the colors overdye easily and they look good. I always use RIT dye. It's the easiest to work with (both liquid & powder) and gives the best results. I also started with a new 'Warrior Revolution" head for this dye job. (Zero prep time!)
Step #1: I boiled the water in a pot large enough to completely cover the head. (I used my Mom's huge soup pot! Sorry, Mom!) After the water boiled, I turned the heat off and waited about 5 minutes and then added the YELLOW RIT dye. This was the 1st color. I added the head , mesh, and sidewall string. I removed the mesh and sidewall strings after approximately 5 minutes, and set these aside for later. I removed the head after 10 minutes. The string and mesh absorb the color faster, so they do not require as long to dye. After I removed the head, I rinsed it off and dried it well. (Very important for the next step!) I then placed small square stickers over the entire surface of the stick. I used electrician's wire marker stickers. You can buy these at most hardware stores. It's important to place these randomly to get a great effect at the end. After these stickers were in place, I used a blowdryer to heat-set them. This prevents the dyes from bleeding under the stickers and also so they stay in place during the remaining dying process.

Step #2: I then repeated Step #1 using ORANGE RIT dye. I didn't add the mesh or sidewallstrings, but I did add the shooting strings.

Step #3: I used BLACK RIT dye for my final color. I followed Step #1, dying the head only and I did not add stickers at the end.

Step #4: After the head was rinsed and dried, I removed all of the stickers ( with the help of my sister, Kel). This step is the most time consuming but it's worth it! The stick looks so cool as the stickers come off! Don't worry if all of the sticker glue does not come off at first, it wears off quickly with use.

Step #5: I strung the head with the YELLOW dyed 'Warrior' hard mesh and sidewall string, and the ORANGE dyed shooting strings using a technique I learned from Pat Miller (JHU defenseman) at camp this summer. (Thanks! Pat)

Step #6: I pinched the head using an electrician's heat gun (Dad's help needed here!) and squeezing the sides together. The gun offers more control then the microwave, etc. for pinching.

Ian has been stringing and dying sticks for about a year and a half. He's 12 years old and has been playing lacrosse for 4 years. He plays attack on 3 teams- St. Edmond's Academy where he attends school; Newark, Delaware Panthers club team (10-0 season in '99); and the American Eagles 16U invitational team.
The Eagles hosted, and beat the Eltham Lacrosse team from Australia this summer. Ian is also a ballboy for the University of Delaware Men's Lacrosse Team. He plans to attend Georgetown Prep in Bethesda, MD for high school and then on to JHU or Georgetown for college. "Lacrosse is my life!" He says, "Everywhere I go the stick draws a lot of attention. It's also landed me quite a few dye jobs!"

Stay tuned for more stick dyeing contests on E-Lacrosse!